Citizenship and Digital Citizenship – What’s the difference?

 

Untitled presentation (1)Is there a difference between citizenship and digital citizenship? 

Citizenship can be formally defined as “the quality of an individual’s response to membership in a community.”

Digital citizenship lends itself more to “the quality of an individual’s response to membership in a community”, or in simpler terms, “the self-monitored habits that sustain and improve the digital communities you enjoy or depend on.”

My personal definition of digital citizenship pertains to your actions in the digital world, “the way you and others interact using digital resources”.

Digital citizenship is such a blanket term for so many different aspects of interaction using digital devices. Guidelines such as the following have to be taught and constantly monitored in the classroom, especially the elementary classroom. The following six elements are monitored very closely on our campus. They are covered with four easy to remember terms, and discussed frequently. On our elementary campus, we understand the importance in creating a bedrock for digital citizenship giving future teachers a solid foundation on which to build upon.

Ribble (2015) Digital Citizenship Approach Elementary Stems used to address Digital Citizenship (Practical Terms)
Digital communication – There are numerous ways to communicate online, and citizens need to make wise decisions in what and how they communicate. Respect for yourself and others

Never intentionally make another person feel bad about themselves or their work

Digital etiquette – Citizenship comes with a responsibility to follow etiquette when communicating with others. Respect for yourself and others

Never intentionally make another person feel bad about themselves or their work

Digital law – Citizens have a responsibility to behave ethically and be aware of laws governing them. Respect the work of other people

Give credit where credit is due

Digital rights and responsibilities – The rights of users are shared equally.  These rights come with responsibilities. Respect the work of other people

Give credit where credit is due

Digital health and wellness – Physical and psychological issues can occur when ergonomics and other problems are not addressed. Respect for yourself and others

Never intentionally make another person feel bad about themselves or their work

Digital security – Citizens must take action to protect their information online. Never ever share passwords

 

References

Definition Of Digital Citizenship. (2017). TeachThought. Retrieved 1 June 2017, from http://www.teachthought.com/the-future-of-learning/digital-citizenship-the-future-of-learning/the-definition-of-digital-citzenship/

 

Ribble, M. (2015). Digital citizenship in schools: Nine elements all students should know (3rd ed.). Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education

 

 

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